Turkestan and the Fate of the Russian Empire

The central argument of this book is that the half-century of Russian rule in Central Asia was shaped by traditions of authoritarian rule, by Russian national interests, and by a civic reform agenda that brought to Turkestan the principles that informed Alexander II’s reform policies. This civilizing mission sought to lay the foundations for a rejuvenated, ‘modern’ empire, unified by imperial citizenship, patriotism, and a shared secular culture. Evidence for Brower’s thesis is drawn from major archives in Uzbekistan Okumaya devam et

Reklamlar

The Duab of Turkestan

W. Rickmer Rickmers (1873–1965) was a German explorer and mountaineer who visited and explored central Asia five times between 1894 and 1906. This book provides an account of his travels in the area he calls Turkestan, which incorporates modern Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and south-west Kazakhstan, and was first published in 1913. The region, which contains the ancient cities of Samarkand and Bukhara, had not been previously described in so much detail by a western European traveller. Okumaya devam et